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3 Pantry Science Experiments for Kids

3 Pantry Science Experiments for Kids

Goldfish crackers. Book reports. Jam hands. Going back to school is an exciting (yet nerve-wracking) time. Getting back into a lunch packing routine? Different story. That's why we co-designed three Science Snack Packs with the Exploratorium to make lunchboxes a little more interesting this year. 

Each pack comes with a science experiment from the Exploratorium easy enough to conduct in the cafeteria or at home, along with a week’s worth of mix-and-match snacks for lunchbox, after-school-pickup-meltdown, and homework-bribery purposes – curated by us at Good Eggs. If you want to recreate the experiments a second time, everything you need for each experiment is probably already in your pantry! 


 Good Eggs Meal Kits  Exploratorium Snack Pack - Experiment 1  $19.99

Good Eggs Meal Kits
Exploratorium Snack Pack - Experiment 1
$19.99

 Good Eggs Meal Kits  Exploratorium Snack Pack - Experiment 2  $19.99

Good Eggs Meal Kits
Exploratorium Snack Pack - Experiment 2
$19.99

 Good Eggs Meal Kits  Exploratorium Snack Pack - Experiment 3  $19.99

Good Eggs Meal Kits
Exploratorium Snack Pack - Experiment 3
$19.99


Experiment #1: Pasta Quake

Simulate an earthquake by breaking spaghetti.

science-experiment-pasta-good-eggs

What You Need:

Dry spaghetti

Instructions:

1. Hold up one piece of spaghetti. Bend it between your hands until it breaks. Notice the work it takes to break the spaghetti.

2. Now collect 32 pieces of spaghetti. Hold them between your hands and bend them until they break.

3. Collect the remaining strands of spaghetti and try to break them all at once.

What’s Going On? 

The currently used scale for the energy released in an earthquake is named the moment magnitude scale. It is an exponential scale. An increase of one unit on the scale represents an increase in energy released by a factor of 32.

Let’s say breaking one strand of spaghetti represents a magnitude 5 “pasta quake.” That makes breaking 32 strands a magnitude 6, and breaking the remaining spaghetti about a magnitude 7. Earthquakes that are high on the magnitude scale release a lot of energy.


Experiment #2: Remote Control Roller

Make a soda can move without touching it.

science-experiment-soda-can-good-eggs

What You Need:

Empty can of Spindrift
Inflated balloon

Instructions:

1. Put the can on its side on a table or the floor—any place that's flat and smooth. Hold it with your finger until it stays still.

2. Rub the balloon back and forth quickly on your hair.

3. Hold the balloon about an inch from the side of the can. The can will start to wiggle even though you're not touching it. Some might even roll!

What's Going On?

When you rub a balloon on your hair, the balloon ends up loaded with electrons. Your empty aluminum can is neutrally charged, meaning it has equal numbers of electrons and protons spread evenly around it. When the negatively charged, electron-loaded part of the balloon is held near the can, it repels the electrons in the part of the can closest to the balloon because a negatively charged object repels other negatively charged objects (just like magnets).


Experiment #3: Sense of Taste

Try to tell the difference between an apple and a potato.

science-experiment-apple-good-eggs

What You Need:

Peeled and cut apple
Peeled and cut potato

Instructions:

Close your eyes and hold your nose while someone feeds you a piece of apple or potato without telling you which is which. Let it sit on your tongue for about a minute. Try to guess which one is in your mouth without letting go of your nose. Describe the flavors you experience.

What's Going On?

Approximately 80–90% of what we perceive as "taste" is in fact due to our sense of smell (think about how dull food tastes when you have a cold or a stuffy nose). At the beginning of this experiment you might not be able to tell if you’re tasting a potato or an apple. But over time, as the apple or potato sits on your tongue, you may notice that you can identify the specific taste. This is because some scent molecules travel up the back of your throat and to your nose.

Hungry for more? Find other science experiments to conduct at home designed by the Exploratorium at exploratorium.edu/sciencesnacks. 

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