Absurdly fresh groceries, delivered. 

Our Commitment to Sustainable Packaging [Infographic]

Our Commitment to Sustainable Packaging [Infographic]

Between updating our sourcing standards, introducing new products, and finding better ways to pack and deliver your groceries, we’re always looking for ways to improve here at Good Eggs. That’s why, as the Director of Strategic Projects, I spent much of last year exploring and testing more than 100 different packaging solutions. Prior to the start of this project, only our boxes and brown paper bags were recyclable. Now, (almost!) every piece of packaging we use to deliver absurdly fresh groceries is reusable, recyclable, or compostable. Here’s how it works:

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  • Cardboard boxes — We’ll reuse them! In fact, we reused more than 100,000 Good Eggs boxes in 2018 (but only the ones that were good as new). Return them to your driver or leave them out when you’re expecting your next delivery. When they reach the end of their life, we’ll recycle them. Prefer to recycle them yourself? Just flatten them down and put them out with the rest of your paper goods.

  • Cold sleeves — These are soft plastic and fully recyclable in San Francisco. In another city? You can save them for your next picnic (you deserve a picnic), or return them to us and we’ll recycle them.

  • Bottles — You can recycle bottles with your glass recycling, but if you paid a deposit for them don’t leave money on the table. Just leave them for your driver when you’re expecting a delivery and we’ll credit your account with the amount.

  • Produce bags — These are fully compostable. Use them to bag up your scraps and throw it all into the compost bin. Maybe someday it’ll be used to grow something absurdly fresh!

  • Cold packs — If you’re in San Francisco, you can recycle the lining with your other soft plastics — just cut open the bag and empty the gel into your trash before you do. You can also return them to us with your next order.

  • Containers — You can wash and reuse these to store ingredients and leftovers, or recycle them curbside if your food storage needs are already taken care of.

  • Dry ice — A little bit goes a long way toward keeping your ice cream cold. Leave the dry ice in the paper bag and place in a plastic container in a well-ventilated area. Choose a spot that is not accessible to kids and animals and allow the dry ice to evaporate.

We’ve made a lot of progress in the last year, but we’re not done yet. We’re still trying to figure out our ice packs, for example, because the gel inside can’t be recycled or composted. We tried using packs that were 100 percent water, but that meant one tiny puncture could flood your groceries. So we’re sticking with our gel packs for now and hoping to move to water and a reusable hard shell as soon as it’s feasible. We’re also exploring collaborations with ice pack producers to find a biodegradable solution that would be safe for your drain or compost bin. We’re even considering ways to keep your food cold using no ice packs at all.

Throughout this process of tests and trials, we’ve worked closely with Recology to make sure different packaging solutions are as sustainable as their manufacturers claim (often, they’re not). There tends to be a disconnect between the way manufacturers make things and the way customers dispose of them, so we’re using our voice to make that connection and encourage change. To do this, we’ve collaborated with some awesome companies and organizations, like Majestic Packaging, EcoSafe Zero Waste, OSC², and Veritiv.

All that being said, we still want to hear from you. Our customers and their kids find lots of creative ways to reuse our packaging, from school science projects to robot costumes. But we also know that you might have some thoughts about ice packs and other packaging solutions. Email us at packaging@goodeggs.com to share your feedback.

And lastly, if you’re ever uncertain about what to do with Good Eggs packaging, just leave it out for your driver. We’ll pick it up, sort it, and make sure it’s reused, recycled, or composted so you don’t have to think twice.

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