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Getting local groceries just got easier: We’ve mobil-ized!


Now it’s even easier to shop direct from the local farmers & foodmakers on Good Eggs. We’ve built a new mobile site, chock full of all the same great local food you’ll find on our desktop site.

Order this week’s breakfast in the time it takes your coffee to brew, grab sandwich fixins while on the bus, or get the season’s first strawberries before you get out of bed. Getting your groceries takes just moments, now that your favorite local farmers, butchers, bakers and jam-makers are just a mobile phone away.

Adding to your basket is a cinch with our handy quick-add buttons.imageYour basket will update on both our desktop site and mobile site, so you can quickly add items—even when you’re in the middle of something—and they’ll be saved for later. Or check out right then: once you’ve saved your preferences, checkout is just one click.imageWant to know more about those chocolate chip cookies? Or who grew your navel oranges? You’ll find lots of info about each product and producer by tapping on the photo.imageNo matter who’s doing the ordering, our mobile site lets you easily check groceries off your list and get back to the rest of your day.

We built our mobile site with lots of input from our community. And as always, we love hearing your feedback. If you’re reading this on your phone, you can head straight to goodeggs.com to check it out and let us know what you think!

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12 Top Food Reads of 2013

As the final days of 2013 wind down, we pulled together a dozen stories that had us abuzz this year. Find yourself a warm drink, put your feet up, and take a chronological look back with us, won’t you?

The Extraordinary Science Of Addictive Junk Food (NY Times)
Yogurt with twice as much sugar as Lucky Charms. The endless lab tests to produce Cherry Vanilla Dr. Pepper. And something called “vanishing caloric density.” Science that will stop at nothing to keep you eating.


Some Of My Best Friends Are Germs (NY Times)
Michael Pollan on the unseen, wild and oft misunderstood world of your microbiome. Or, why staying healthy may go hand in hand with getting dirty.


The Amazing Disappearing Supermarket: Building The 21st Century Grocery Store (SF Weekly)
How technology can change the way Americans shop for groceries. We couldn’t resist including an article about changing food systems and, well, us!


Why Food Stamps Matter (The New Yorker)
With ailing health and a mountain of medical bills, Vicenta Delgado’s $34 per month in food stamps is her lifeline. How cutting food stamp programs leaves many without a reliable source of food.


Food Waste: The Next Food Revolution (Modern Farmer)
1 billion people are hungry globally, yet half of all food in the last year was thrown out. One study found 14% of Americans’ trash was edible goods still in its packaging. Why this happens and how we can start to fix it.


New California Law Aims To Cultivate Urban Agriculture (LA Times)
California will lower property taxes on plots of land if they’re committed to growing food for at least 5 years. SF’s own Little City Gardens is featured!


The Farm Bill Explained In Two Minutes (Washington Post)
Time’s ticking on the passage of the Farm Bill (it’s due January 1st). Good thing you can get the basics in 143 seconds. And check out this wishlist for a healthy Farm Bill from Civil Eats.


What It’s Like To Sneak Across The Border To Harvest Food (Mother Jones)
Seth Holmes, author of Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies, shares what he saw in his eighteen months living in labor camps with migrant farm workers doing backbreaking work so Americans can eat healthier.


In Memoriam: Judy Rodgers Of Zuni Cafe (KQED)
A profile of Judy Rodgers, the creative force behind San Francisco’s beloved Zuni Cafe and author of The Zuni Cafe Cookbook


FDA To Phase Out Non-Medical Antibiotic Use By Farms (LA Times)
A long overdue move, especially considering that farms consume 80% of the nation’s antibiotic supply.


GMO Labeling Becomes Law In Connecticut (Grist)
Despite similar bills being defeated in California and Washington States, Connecticut becomes the first U.S. state to (sort of) pass mandatory GMO labeling.


Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms
(NPR)
Step aside, McMansions, a new, more nourishing type of housing is sprouting up in the U.S.

 

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Good Eggs Gifting Is Here!

One of the most frequent requests we’ve heard from our community is a desire to share Good Eggs with their friends and family. Just in time for the holidays, we’re launching Good Eggs gifting! You can now share the love for local food with the good eggs in your life:

  • Gift cards: Let them pick out exactly what they want! Gift cards can be used by loved ones in any Good Eggs location: SF Bay, Brooklyn, LA or New Orleans.

  • Gift boxes: Brimming with the best local nibbles and guaranteed to be polished off in a flash. Check out the tastes of SF Bay, Brooklyn, LA and New Orleans!

  • Gift orders: Send a holiday care package full of local goodness. Just place an order and let us know who it’s for - we’ll do the rest!

Whether your loved ones are in the San Francisco Bay Area, Brooklyn, LA or New Orleans, you can send something special right to their doorsteps… and you can be sure it won’t be re-gifted. Because there’s nothing like the gift of food, especially when it’s made by the local farmers & foodmakers in your community.

Here’s to a tasty holiday!
Rob, Alon & the Good Eggs team

LolaBee’s Harvest is joining forces with Good Eggs

At the heart of the local food movement is a sense of community: at farmers’ markets and community gardens and dinner tables, local food brings people together. Today, we’re excited to announce that we’re coming together with one of our favorite local food businesses, LolaBee’s Harvest. LolaBee’s is becoming a part of Good Eggs to bring great local food to more people.

We share the same goals as LolaBee’s so the transition is a natural one for both of us. We both aim to support our local food system by making it easier to buy great local food. And now LolaBee’s customers can shop on Good Eggs and find the same great food, plus lots of new options. LolaBee’s customers can also now choose from deliveries five days a week in more areas, including the Peninsula and Marin. As part of the transition, we’re also extending our delivery zone to more East Bay neighborhoods, including San Leandro.

We’re thrilled to have LolaBee’s now be part of Good Eggs!

- Rob Spiro & Alon Salant, founders


About LolaBee’s Harvest
LolaBee’s Harvest is an online farmers market sourcing the freshest produce, pasture-raised meats, dairy, eggs and prepared foods from local farmers and artisans and delivering to customers’ doorsteps. The company was founded in November, 2011 by Lauren and Debbie Bass with the mission to make farm fresh food more accessible and to help farmers thrive. LolaBee’s is excited to reach more people and work with more farmers as a part of Good Eggs.


About Good Eggs
Good Eggs connects you to local farmers and foodmakers. Shop for the fresh local groceries you want, and we deliver it all to your door. Good Eggs city marketplaces are designed to support independent local farmers and foodmakers who enrich their communities, use sustainable practices, treat employees fairly, and make their food with care. Good Eggs is available in the San Francisco Bay Area and is piloting in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, and New Orleans, with plans to expand to other metropolitan areas soon.

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Good Eggs Launches in Brooklyn!

After piloting in a few neighborhoods over the past months, we’re launching our full marketplace—complete with deliveries and convenient pickups—to all of Brooklyn! That means you can order great local food from Good Eggs for delivery four days a week, from Tuesday to Friday, and we’ll do the schlepping for you.

Our marketplace is stocked with fresh local produce, pasture-raised meats and dairy, chef-made meals, baked goods and more. You’ll even find produce and pasture-raised eggs from my family’s Hudson valley farm, Fishkill Farms, on Good Eggs.

Small-batch producers and family farms like mine are selling at farmers’ markets and through CSAs around the country, but we haven’t been able to compete with the ubiquity and convenience of the supermarket—until now. Good Eggs gets local food from farm to table in a way that’s smarter and quicker, allowing local businesses who are doing the right thing to grow and succeed.

Shopping on Good Eggs means you’re buying your groceries directly from local farmers and foodmakers. You can see who made your food, learn more about them, and contact them directly. You place your order, they prepare your food, and we deliver it right to you.

So my fellow Brooklynites, I invite you to order up some local flavor. And for a taste of the full Good Eggs Brooklyn marketplace, join us at our launch party on Sunday, November 10th!

- Josh Morgenthau, Founding Farmer, Good Eggs NYC


About Good Eggs
Good Eggs connects you to local farmers and foodmakers. Shop for the fresh local groceries you want, and we deliver it all to your door. Good Eggs city marketplaces are designed to support independent local farmers and foodmakers who enrich their communities, use sustainable practices, treat employees fairly, and make their food with care. Good Eggs started in the San Francisco Bay Area and is now fully launched in Brooklyn, with plans to expand to Manhattan in the spring! We’re also piloting in Los Angeles and New Orleans and will be adding other metropolitan areas soon.

 

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We’re thrilled to partner with Sequoia Capital to grow & sustain local food systems worldwide

Today marks an exciting milestone for Good Eggs! Our mission to grow and sustain local food systems is at the heart of everything we do, and we’re thrilled to now have the support of our newest partner, Sequoia Capital.

We’ve partnered with Sequoia on our Series A funding with participation from Harrison Metal and other investors. As part of our partnership, Bryan Schreier, partner at Sequoia, will join the Good Eggs Board of Directors (that’s him packing a Good Eggs order).

In partnering with Good Eggs, a mission-driven organization, Sequoia is investing its resources in building a better food system. In the words of Bryan Schreier: “It’s time to make eating local a viable, convenient alternative for all of us. We believe in the mission that’s driving Good Eggs, the team that’s fulfilling it, and the local farmers and foodmakers who are growing and making food with integrity around the world.”

So what does this mean for you? If you’re in our current community of eaters or producers, you’ll see growing local marketplaces with more great food. From our full Bay Area marketplace to our pilots in Brooklyn, Los Angeles and New Orleans, we’ll be connecting more people with their local farmers and foodmakers. And we’ll be coming to dozens more cities in the near future! As always, we remain driven by the social and environmental good we can do with an innovative, high integrity, local alternative for feeding our families.

We’re looking forward to working with the team at Sequoia and building a bright future for local food and the producers who make it possible.

-Rob Spiro & Alon Salant, founders

About Good Eggs
Good Eggs connects you to local farmers and foodmakers. Shop for the fresh local groceries you want, and we deliver it all to your door. Good Eggs city marketplaces are designed to support independent local farmers and foodmakers who enrich their communities, use sustainable practices, treat employees fairly, and make their food with care. Good Eggs is available in the San Francisco Bay Area and is piloting in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, and New Orleans, with plans to expand to other metropolitan areas soon.

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5 Reasons You Should Try Good Eggs
(and spread the word!)

Dear neighbors,

Good Eggs is not a normal grocery store – or a normal internet startup. And the reasons we think you should buy your groceries from Good Eggs are maybe different than what you expect to hear… it’s not just about quality/convenience/price, though we think we do a great job on all those things. You should shop from the farmers & foodmakers on Good Eggs because they are making our society and local ecosystems better for everybody.  

Here are five potentially-unexpected reasons you should try Good Eggs (and spread the word!):

  1. Good Eggs is good for farmers & foodmakers. The entire Good Eggs system was designed with the help of Bay Area food producers to meet their needs. It’s like an evolution of the CSA concept – farmers get to connect directly with their customers and get a great price on their food without needing to invest in their own distribution network. It’s a great complement to farmers’ markets for local food businesses.

  2. Good Eggs carries food you can’t find elsewhere. Gluten-free anything, truly pastured meats, meals from top independent chefs, sustainable seafood caught that morning, baby food made to order. This stuff isn’t in grocery stores. Good Eggs is structurally able to support smaller producers who can’t sell into grocery stores because they don’t have economies of scale, or because their food is too fresh to live among grocery store inventory.

  3. We’re building a grassroots alternative to the capitalist machine. Here’s where the mission behind Good Eggs gets really ambitious. The aisles at big grocery stores are ultimately controlled by Fortune 500 executives who sell junk to the people of America so they can increase their stock price. Good Eggs is an alternative because there are no big food companies behind it, it’s all about a grassroots network of small food businesses collaborating to feed more folks. Good Eggs is a mission-driven startup that will always maintain transparency and integrity, made up of city operations that are independently run by local people. It’s a better, more just model of capitalism than the massive-corporation-oligarchy that seems to dominate more and more sectors of our daily lives. When Good Eggs grows nationally it will provide a template for how grassroots local networks can compete in other industries.

  4. Local food is better for everybody. The producers on Good Eggs are caring for the land and their animals, using fair labor practices on their farms, and producing food that is significantly healthier for you to eat. When you shop on Good Eggs you’re ordering directly from these local food producers; they harvest or make your food, bring it to us, and we deliver it to you. As more dollars go towards locally-owned, responsible businesses, the more local communities will succeed and the more local food becomes accessible. It’s a win-win-win for shoppers, local economies, and our environment.

  5. Chances are, you’re going to love it. It’s a fact: the majority of people who try Good Eggs once end up ordering again. It’s super convenient to have your groceries delivered, it’s cheaper than the big chain natural food supermarkets, and the food is fresher and better.  

Our goal is to make real change in our food system - and our daily lives - by helping us all remember that actual people make our food, by turning away from mass-produced junk in every corner of our lives and opting for something better in one realm where it really matters. And in the process, we’ll eat really well.  

We need your help, humbly and sincerely, to spread the word. We hope you’ll take part in our mission to grow and sustain local food systems by sharing this list, sharing Good Eggs, and recruiting more folks to buy their groceries from our local farmers & foodmakers. Join us!

-Rob Spiro, co-founder and CEO

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Good Eggs is budding in Brooklyn!

Over the past year, we’ve spoken to hundreds of farmers and foodmakers across the country, all looking for new ways to sell directly to their customers. At the same time, we’ve heard from community members and friends—especially in New York City—that they want more ways to buy local food.

So, with great excitement, we’re bringing Good Eggs to Brooklyn!

Good Eggs began in San Francisco in 2011 with a mission to grow and sustain local food systems worldwide. With a marketplace of hundreds of local food producers, Good Eggs allows Bay Area folks to shop for groceries from the best producers, and have their orders delivered right to their doorsteps.

And now, beginning with some incredible farmers and foodmakers (including my own farm in the Hudson Valley!) people can get a taste of Good Eggs in Brooklyn. Check out our list of initial producers, whose webstands went live this week:

  • Farmers’ Market Fix: DIY dinner kits, fresh from the Greenmarket and ready to cook.
  • Splendid Spoon: Veggie-centric delicious soups, delivered on bicycle.
  • Farm to Baby NYC: The best organic seasonal produce, handmade into meals for little ones.
  • Free Bread: Just-baked breads packed with goodness—minus the gluten.
  • Gabe The Fish Babe: Sustainable seafood plucked straight from local waters.
  • Fishkill Farms: Produce, eggs, cider and more, all from my family farm.
  • Pie Corps: Handmade sweet and savory pies from Greenpoint, BK.

And more launching soon:

  • Sweet Deliverance: Home cooking made easy with weekly prepared meal boxes.
  • Eat Food Distributors: Dairy, meat and produce sourced from Vermont and New York family farms.
  • Hudson Valley Harvest: Frozen fruits and vegetables from Hudson Valley farms, ready to use for year-round local cooking.
  • Sawkill Farm: Pastured meats grown & raised in Red Hook, NY.

We’re aiming for a full launch this summer, with an online marketplace full of great farmers and producers from the region as well as a distribution system to bring it all directly to you.

You should join us! If you’re interested in selling on Good Eggs, let us know! Want to know more? Send us a note at info@goodeggs.com—we’d love to chat!

- Josh Morgenthau, Founding Farmer, Good Eggs Brooklyn; Farmer, Fishkill Farms

 

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Announcing Good Eggs in the entire Bay Area! 

Local food is at the heart of everything we do here at Good Eggs. So we’re thrilled to announce a new way to go grocery shopping; one that puts the best food on your table and connects you to the folks who made it. Good Eggs is now available throughout the Bay Area, so you can shop for the freshest local groceries, order online, and we’ll deliver right to your door. 

Whether it’s organic fruits and veggies, fresh bread, sustainably-caught fish, or handmade cheeses, we’ve got hundreds of options to fill your basket. When you shop for your groceries on Good Eggs, you’re buying directly from the farmers and foodmakers who make your food. Ordering ahead means they know exactly how much to harvest or make and when, so your food comes to you right from the field or the kitchen. And nothing’s sitting around as extra inventory, which cuts out unnecessary waste.

People are once again seeking what’s been lost from our food for a while now: Fruits and vegetables that are grown without toxic chemicals and in ways that replenish the land. Meat, dairy and fish from animals that were treated with respect. Using nutritious, whole ingredients in the first place, rather than relying on processed food or added synthetic nutrients. A connection to your farmer or butcher or baker, someone who’ll answer your questions, or who’ll remember your order. 

We created Good Eggs to help restore a better way of eating—and living. To grow and sustain local food systems worldwide. And to make it easy to shop from actual people, for food that’s really, really good.

“I got into cooking out of self-defense.”
— Mark Bittman

The Mystique of The Leek

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They’re just so chic. And good for the physique. Take a peek (We’ll stop rhyming. Promise.):

“You, as a food buyer, have the distinct privilege of proactively participating in shaping the world your children will inherit.”
— Joel Salatin

Here Comes The Sunchoke

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Ginger, is that you? Oh, excuse me, you’re something entirely different. “Sunchoke,” you say? Hm. Tell me more. Lucky Peach’s Rachel Khong has the scoop on what, exactly, the sunchoke is (and isn’t).

“If you fail a lot, just call it ‘recipe developing.’”
— Melissa Clark